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Dead or Alive

The Telus World of Science was originally designed by Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal. But its expansions weren’t. How should we treat iconic buildings as the years go on? Especially when the creator is still alive and kicking? We’ve got the story of the many, many times Douglas Cardinal’s buildings have been changed over the years, and how he feels about it.

In this episode, we spoke to Douglas Cardinal, Edmonton-based architect and Cafe Mosaics co-owner Khuyen Des, and Telus World of Science President & CEO Alan Nursall.

This episode first aired on July 27, 2016.

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Authenticity

This week: What’s authentic? Emmanuel Jal was born in South Sudan and became a child solider at the age of 7. He’s now become a global citizen through his work as an activist, hip-hop artist and storyteller. We talked to Emmanuel about how he tries to stay true to himself and where he comes from.

And we dive deep into the debate about cultural appropriation of Indigenous art and culture. Cold Lake First Nation artist Dawn Marie Marchand joins us to talk about the lengths she goes to make her art respectfully, and whether Edmontonians really should #boycottyegarts, as Metis writer and academic Zoe Todd has advocated on her blog.

This episode first aired on August 19, 2015.

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The Neutral Zone

We see little glimpses of artists’ lives through their work. But what’s in the neutral zone: the space between being at centre stage – having everyone pay attention to your work – and your regular life? We ask Edmontonian Susan Sneath, who moved away from a life in theatre, radio and TV. And we speak to renowned artist Joseph Sanchez, one of the Professional Native Indian Artists Inc (aka the “Native Group of Seven”), about how their fight to get Indigenous art embraced by the mainstream changed the way he saw himself. MacKenzie Art Gallery curator Michelle LaVallee talks about creating an exhibit of the group’s work touring across Canada.

The episode first aired on March 9, 2016.

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The Past

This week, the first of two FunDrive episodes recorded live at CJSR: what art can tell us about the past? Author, rapper and broadcaster Wab Kinew will be speaking about his new memoir The Reason You Walk. And University of Saskatchewan Professor Yin Liu will join us to talk about the surprising origins of the blank spaces between our words.

This episode first aired on September 23, 2015.

Audio

Authenticity

This week: What’s authentic? Emmanuel Jal was born in South Sudan and became a child solider at the age of 7. He’s now become a global citizen through his work as an activist, hip-hop artist and storyteller. We talked to Emmanuel about how he tries to stay true to himself and where he comes from.

And we dive deep into the debate about cultural appropriation of Indigenous art and culture. Cold Lake First Nation artist Dawn Marie Marchand joins us to talk about the lengths she goes to make her art respectfully, and whether Edmontonians really should #boycottyegarts, as Metis writer and academic Zoe Todd has advocated on her blog.

This episode first aired on August 19, 2015.

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Boot Camp Poets Pt. 2

This week: Boot Camp Poets. How could rap or poetry help inmates at the Edmonton Remand Centre find a different life, and what roadblocks might be in their way? This is the second half of a two-part documentary speaking to inmates in the Edmonton Remand Centre’s Boot Camp unit.

In this episode, John Howard Society’s Howie Hoggins speaks to us about what’s ahead for men in the Boot Camp unit transitioning out of prison. Métis writer and researcher Patti Laboucane-Benson tell us what her graphic novel The Outside Circle has to say about why so many Aboriginal people end up behind bars. And we hear more poetry from Boot Camp unit inmates Joshua Charles Thom, Michael Nelson, and Nathan Laboucan.

This episode first aired on July 15, 2015. Listen to Part 1 here.

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Boot Camp Poets Pt. 1

This week: Boot Camp Poets. How do folks end up behind bars at the Edmonton Remand Centre – and how could rap or poetry help them find a different life? On this week’s show, we speak to inmates in the Edmonton Remand Centre’s Boot Camp unit for the first half of a special two-part documentary.

The men we interviewed for this episode include Robert Deschamps, Donnie Kleppe, Dillon McKenzie and Chris Pruden.

This episode first aired on July 8, 2015. Listen to Part 2 here.

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Preaching to the Choir

This week: how do we go beyond preaching to the choir? How do we open up a conversation beyond the inner circle? We’ve got two stories today – one about a cross-country project called Train of Thought aiming to get First Nations and settler people talking about the struggles we have in common. In the other, we speak to actor Connor Yuzwenko-Martin about his role in the play Tribes at the U of A’s Studio Theatre. It’s an attempt to get deaf and hearing communities to understand each other better.

This episode first aired on May 20, 2015.